Black and White

Black and White

As a photographer and a lover of art, I have always loved looking at a good black and white image.

I like how, sometimes, when you remove the color, the true intent of the image just pops out at you with power.

There is something in the simplicity of a black and white image that makes it feel complex — makes it something you can stare at for hours to find all the details.

At the recent Equine Photographers photography retreat in Wyoming, I felt several of the images come through my lens in black and white — even though they were made in color. That doesn’t happen as much any more – I spend  more time in the colorful realm it seems.

Years ago, I used to buy black and white film to make a black and white image — I had to choose between black and white or color. With digital technology, you get to have both, so the image can tell you how it wants to be seen. Sometimes, I forget to listen. That’s what makes retreats like this one so powerful — you can take the time to really create, listen, feel the images.

Here are some more of the black and whites from this same photo shoot:

Mane

Mane

by Kimberly Beer

The revelation to
your deepest secrets
can be found
in the mane
of a horse,
each tangle
an unraveling
of a question
you didn’t even know
how to ask.

Love is Red

Love is Red

It never ceases to amaze me — the connection between women and horses.

This photo was made in Montana two years ago. It was early, early morning. The girl in the image is a real cowgirl. She works with horses for a living — and by living, I mean in more ways than just as an income. The mare in the image is her horse. I love that about the image, because the emotion is real and you can feel it, even though you can’t see the cowgirl’s face.

When a woman connects with a horse, it is different than a man. Not better. Not worse. Just different. Women and horses share something on a deep level, something untouchable by logic. Maybe it’s the intimate knowledge of what it’s like to be prey. Maybe it’s the instinctual comfort of two beings sharing an sentient journey. It’s expression is beauty and love realized and I’m honored to be able to tell the story of that expression through my lens.

Joy

Joy

This is a composite image created in Photoshop. It was commissioned as a web banner for TouchedbyaHorse.com. It features a horse named Romeo, a paper background and then overlays of Photoshop brushes.

Creating composite images is a passion of mine. The technique used in this image is a collage of filters and brushes and background and masks. Each one of the composite images I create is a labor of love, and I spend a lot of time editing and re-editing.

This image is named “Joy” because that’s the feeling it gives me. I love this horse’s sassy attitude (he’s really a sweet heart and a bit of a comedian) and paired it with the yellow butterflies (yes, you’ll see a lot of butterflies in my work, I’m drawn to them and what they symbolize) and the passionate orange brown colors.