Forsaken Gallery: Fordson Power Major

Forsaken Gallery: Fordson Power Major

This Fordson tractor is at my cousin’s house. Many members of my family love to collect junk with the thought of future repair — but it often gets abandoned to more pressing projects and time. Farms have a way of doing that to you — stealing away even the best intentions. It is not at all unusual to find tractors, combines, plows, and other implements simply left where they were last used. I love the added effect of the tools in the seat, all growing moss and rust along with the tractor itself. It makes you wonder what life intervened in this tractor’s repair — what was the last thought before laying down the tools in the seat and moving on never to return?

About the Forsaken Gallery

Forsaken objects fascinate me.

What we leave behind, abandon, relinquish, disown, junk, dump and scrap absolutely amazes me. It says a lot about who we are as a culture, that forsaken objects are in abundance throughout our world. It says a lot about an individual as to what unique forsaken objects he or she has discarded.

Junk and junk yards have been a favorite photographic haunt of mine since my very first camera. Some of the very first images I made were of disavowed items. They are a favorite subject in this blog. They include everything from living breathing animals to houses; tractors to Anastazi Ruins; trucks to trinkets; skulls to shells.

Sunflowers

Sunflowers

Grinter Farms (https://www.facebook.com/GrinterFarms) is this wonderful place near Lawrence, Kansas that willingly lets people wander around in their sunflower field. How absolutely AWESOME is that?

And there are a BOATLOAD (well, I would use a more colorful term actually) of people who come out and wander around amongst the big yellow flowers. This year, I and my cohort Jen Wewers were two among many.

It actually took us two trips — we had one quick “golden hour” trip planned, but that turned out to be a little off the mark. (This is what happens when you let two “Ps” out of the house together on a creative adventure — and if you don’t know what that means, let’s just say both Jen and I are easily distracted.) When we arrived, 90 minutes into the golden hour, there were so many people there was not place to park. Listen to that: there was no place to park in the middle of nowhere Kansas! No place — let alone a proper place. (And there are parking rules, Jen looked them up).

The second trip was way before the golden hour, and the flowers were a little past their prime, but it was still an amazing experience and I like the images I got while there. Have a look …